Nurture Program

The six principles of nurture groups

•1. Children's learning is understood developmentally

 

 

•2. The classroom offers a safe base

The organisation of the environment and the way the group is managed contains anxiety. The nurture group room offers a balance of educational and domestic experiences aimed at supporting the development of the children's relationship with each other and with the staff. The nurture group is organised around a structured day with predictable routines. Great attention is paid to detail; the adults are reliable and consistent in their approach to the children. Nurture groups are an educational provision making the important link between emotional containment and cognitive learning.
 
 

 •4. Language is understood as a vital means of communication

Language is more than a skill to be learnt, it is the way of putting feelings into words. Nurture group children often ‘act out' their feelings as they lack the vocabulary to ‘name' how they feel. In nurture groups the informal opportunities for talking and sharing, e.g. welcoming the children into the group or having breakfast together are as important as the more formal lessons teaching language skills. Words are used instead of actions to express feelings and opportunities are created for extended conversations or encouraging imaginative play to understand the feelings of others.

 

 •6. Transitions are significant in the lives of children

The nurture group helps the child make the difficult transition from home to school. However, on a daily basis there are numerous transitions the child makes, e.g. between sessions and classes and between different adults. Changes in routine are invariably difficult for vulnerable children and need to be carefully managed with preparation and support.

- “The Nurture Room is a positive and supportive place that helps and encourages children at times when they are finding it difficult to engage in classwork.  It supports them in different ways as each child’s needs are very different.  It is also a great help for parents if they have any concerns or just need to talk.  The Nurture Room is the heart of the school and I’m sure that many more children will pass through and benefit from this.”

 

- “I feel the Nurture Room is the backbone of the school.  Not just in the room but throughout the whole school.  Not just (for) behavioural (issues) but for children with emotional issues too.  The Nurture Team give the children stability and builds up relationships of trust with the kids.  A lot of children would not be in the (mainstream) school setting if the Nurture Team wasn’t as effective as they are.  The Nurture Team also provide the children’s family with support and advice whilst going through difficult times with diagnosis or the Statementing process.”

 

 

- “I believe that the Nurture Group plays a very important part in my child’s development both in school and at home.”

 

 

 

 

Webster-Startton Incredible Years Therapeutic Dinosaur School programme is one of a set interlocking programmes for parents, children and teachers used as a tool to help children succeed.
 
It was developed for 4 - 8 year olds to help them develop more appropriate social and problem solving skills.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Each session includes activities such as 'feelings' and 'let's suppose' games, cooperative projects and other games to improve cooperation skills.
 
Group leaders praise and reward appropriate behaviours by labelling the behaviour.
 
 
 

Nurture Staff

Learning with Jesus through work and play

  

 

Father Seamus vists St Josephs, to see Bramble and Crumble the rabbits.

In nurture groups staff respond to children not in terms of arbitrary expectations about ‘attainment levels' but in terms of the children's developmental progress assessed through the Boxall Profile Handbook. The response to the individual child is ‘as they are', underpinned by a non-judgemental and accepting attitude.

 

 

 

 •3. Nurture is important for the development of self-esteem

Nurture involves listening and responding. In a nurture group ‘everything is verbalised' with an emphasis on the adults engaging with the children in reciprocal shared activities e.g. play / meals / reading /talking about events and feelings. Children respond to being valued and thought about as individuals, so in practice this involves noticing and praising small achievements; ‘nothing is hurried in nurture groups‘.

 

 

 •5. All behaviour is communication

This principle underlies the adult response to the children's often challenging or difficult behaviour. ‘Given what I know about this child and their development what is this child trying to tell me?' Understanding what a child is communicating through behaviour helps staff to respond in a firm but non-punitive way by not being provoked or discouraged. If the child can sense that their feelings are understood this can help to diffuse difficult situations. The adult makes the link between the external / internal worlds of the child.

 

 
 
 
We recently sent out a questionnaire out to the parents whose children have received support from our Nurture provision. Here are some of the comments we received back.
 
 
 
 

 

- “My son has benefitted from the Nurture Group staff - their support has been brilliant. If I have ever had a problem they have always helped the best they can.  My younger son also goes to Nurture Group and has found it fun to learn with the staff.  My boys are loved and cared for by the staff – I am very happy with their help in my boys’ learning.” 

 

 

 

 

 

- “I don’t know what I would have done without the Nurture Group.  It helped both my child and myself. Thank you.”

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
Webster-Startton Incredible Years Therapeutic Dinosaur School programme
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Dinosaur School programme comprimises 6-8 weeks with weekly sessions covering six seperate programmes:
 
  • Making new friends and learning school rules
  • Understanding and detecting feelings
  • Dina Dinosaur teaches how to do your best in school
  • Detective Wally teaches problem-solving steps (including anger management)
  • Molly Manners teaches how to be friendly and how to talk to friends
Wally, Molly and Dina Dinosaur are puppets.
 
 
For more information on incredible years click on the picture.